15 Things Incoming College Freshmen Should Know

By Lester Asamoah


Welcome to the University of Oklahoma! Welcome to the freshman experience and the college journey. While we are all Sooners, everyone has different backgrounds - some have parents and siblings that have went to college and got super involved, thus they know exactly what to do, who to talk to, and where to go. Others may have parents far removed from college, and there are still plenty of people that have never had a sibling or parent in college. I come from the camp of having no parents or siblings in my [immediate] family that have attended college. Because of that experience, I really value advice and mentorship. I understand that it takes only one club or one experience to change your life or discover something new, so I love doing whatever I can to help make those connections. This exhaustive list of college pro-tips will hopefully help you out in your journey.

 Without further ado, the list:

 1. Go to class - This will help immensely. And I’m not saying this as a “goody-two-shoes” student or anything. I, like many others have missed class on several occasions, legitimate and illegitimate. But the point of class is to help you learn. You would be surprised how just showing up will help, even if it’s an easy class or everything is in the book. When you’re being lazy, just remember that you, your parents, the federal government, or scholarship donors aren’t paying for you to not go to class. It seems cliché, but go to class. 

2. Be strategic - Study smart, not hard. Don’t spend hours reading if you’re not retaining the information, you’re wasting your own time. Don’t agree to study groups if you’re not a study group person. Contrary to the first rule, if you have a choice between finishing a project worth a big part of your grade that is due soon, or going to class that you can miss without any major penalty, you have to understand that maybe you should do your project. Go to class, but be smart with your options. Oh, and if you have a test on Friday, probably shouldn’t go bar hopping the night before. You would be astonished on how many people do that. 

3. Meet new people - You never know who will change your life. There’s at least 5 people I can instantly say that my life would be completely different if I hadn’t have met them. And college is the best time to meet tons of people.

4. Get involved - There’s something on campus for literally everyone. 4.0 students sometimes get rejected from grad schools because they have no personality and nothing to add to the prospective programs. Academics are always and forever number one, but get involved. Freshman year is the time. Don’t even count on Senior year to have a ton of involvement, because you should be prepping for law/medical/grad school or a career. The most transformative and memorable experiences come from student activities. The classroom can never give you student life experiences of leadership, friendship, responsibility, self-esteem, networking, teamwork, etc.

5. Be yourself - College is a time where people try to mold themselves into what they want to be. And yes, while it is a fresh start, you really should just be yourself. Molding will only go so far. Don’t pretend like you’re sporty if you’re not. Don’t act like a lady-killer when you never have had a girlfriend. If you like to party, don’t pretend like you don’t. Your true self will be revealed. However, that’s not to say you can’t improve yourself as a person. 

6. Single is not a bad thing - Don’t waste your time chasing men/women your freshman year. Living through a huge life adjustment is not a good time to even think about dating. Be single, be happy. You’re still growing A LOT freshman year. You may not even know what major you want, much less what kind of guy/gal you want. Calm down. And if you’re coming in with a gf/bf, I would strongly reconsider that decision. Not that you don’t love, like, whatever them, but college is a different ball game, and the success rate of freshman relationships are abysmal. Sorry. 

7. Study Abroad – There are way too many good opportunities to study abroad to pass it up. Studying abroad is a great personal and academic experience. If you’re studying a language, it’s a must have. And there are even programs clamoring for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) majors to study abroad. There is nothing like studying abroad. No matter what your major is, you really learn about yourself and about a completely different culture, which is invaluable and helpful in so many ways. Look into program and plan out a way to study abroad.

8. Meet your professors - Your professors are functional human beings with families and lives. Most importantly, (the majority of them) enjoy students and what they teach. Office hours are your best academic friend. Go to them. Even if you’re not struggling, just touch base and make sure you’re on the right track. It literally makes a grade letter difference. 

9. Take advantage of your meal plan - Please. When you live in an apartment, the struggle becomes so much realer. If you end up living in a sorority/fraternity house, you won’t have any real control of what you want to eat or when you eat it. If you’re starting out in an apartment with no meal plan, bless your heart. 

10. Exercise, Exercise, Exercise - Studies have shown time and time again that exercising improves mental performance. The Huffington Post summarizes my point beautifully in their article. College is overwhelming, but carve time to work out. There are literally no negative repercussions of working out (unless you’re just negligent in the weight room) and you will be a healthier person physically and mentally. 

11. When something is wrong, admit it - If you’re struggling mentally, tell someone. Parents, sorority sises, frat bros, friends, trusted faculty, just tell someone. If you need money, there are resources for finding a job or a loan. If you are not having a good roommate experience, your housing services has been trained for that very problem. If you’re struggling in a class, tell the professor. Things will grow much, much worse the longer you withhold information. Honesty will literally set you free

 12. Make a plan - Your plans are almost guaranteed to change while you are in college, but still write out a six month to one year plan and try to follow that. Do you want to apply (at OU) for Outstanding Freshman? Do you want to get involved in x amount of clubs? Do you want to lose x amount of pounds? Do you want an internship or fellowship? Write everything down and try to stick to it. Yes, things will change, but you should still always have a solid sense of direction. There are few things in life better than accomplishing something major.  

13. Be flexible - I would estimate that around 50 percent of the freshmen that read this blog post will have no idea what they want to major in. The other 50 percent picked a major because they think it will be a good job, or they think they want to actually do that major. Just be flexible. Most high schools don’t expose students to a wide range of opportunities. Open your mind and see what really inspires you. Don’t be afraid to change your major. Be cognizant of your future though - you may love European history, but if you don’t know how to pursue a career in that, think about doing something else. I don’t want to discourage people from taking obscure or fine arts degrees, those are the most interesting and beautiful learning programs, but I do want people to keep in mind that degrees are pieces of paper that won’t put food on the table. 

14. Faith - Faith is a key part to mental health and happiness. If you actively attend church, pursue a church with the same or similar denomination to your faith. Being in a faith-based community of college students that are paving their way like you are is a great way to have immediate comfort and guidance. Additionally, upper classmen in the church/mosque/synagogue can help you work through the unique faith-related issues of college. Going back to no. 5 though, be yourself. Don’t force faith or allow faith to be forced on you if you truly don’t believe - it’s not fair to you or the faith community. I would, however, encourage always at least giving faith at least a chance.

15. Have adventures - Nobody remembers that really stressful US History exam, but everyone remembers staying up all night joking around and bonding together over the stressful exam. Have fun! Have adventures! College is the time for staying up late, exploring college towns, walking around campus at night, football games you’ll never forget, making inside jokes, meeting wonderful people, making mistakes, and making memories. The real world can wait, just enjoy college. None of my best memories ever happened in the classroom. They happened from Oklahoma City all the way to Italy. They happened staying up all night, making snack runs, hitting on girls I could never get with, and going to campus events. College is hard. It’s stressful and demanding. Anyone that says any college is easy is a liar or graduated with a very poor GPA. Even the “easy” majors require countless hours and projects. So enjoy yourself. Work hard, play hard. When you’re 25, 35, 45, you’ll look back at this time. I hope you’ll be able to say that you made the absolute most of it inside and outside of the classroom.


Lester Asamoah is a junior International Security Studies and Arabic major as well as a Ronald E. McNair Scholar. He currently serves the Student Government Association as a member of the Executive Office of the President.

SGA Inauguration and RSO Banquet

Monday evening, campus leaders met to celebrate the closing of a very successful year at the Student Leadership Inauguration and RSO Awards banquet.

Student leaders from every major organization looked on in Beaird Lounge as the new SGA leaders were sworn into office. OU’s new Vice President of SGA, Madeline Grunewald said of the experience, “It feels like a million bucks.”

SGA’s head of the Department of Student Organizations, KatieBeth Gardner, planned the event. Gardner spent much of her time the past few weeks making sure it went off without a hitch. She said her favorite part was getting to see all of the amazing things OU’s student organizations have done.

Many student organizations received awards such as Outstanding RSO, Outstanding New RSO, and Outstanding Student Organization Leader.

With past achievements being recognized, new campus leaders like Grunewald are looking forward to the future.

“We are looking to advance the purpose of SFC, continuing effort for RSO mandatory training online, and uniting the student body in the fight against increasing cost of higher education,” Grunewald said.

The banquet was a wonderful event and a reminder to former leaders and graduation seniors that this is not goodbye; it’s see you later.

OU Hosts Iron & Wine

This past Saturday, university students filled the east lawn of the Oklahoma Memorial Union to hear Iron & Wine perform live—and for free.

The Campus Activities Council, Union Programming Board and OU Summer Session collaborated to end the year on a high note with this one last concert. Leesa Allmond, CAC Concert Series Chair, played a key part in organizing the event. With the help of the UPB Concert Series Chair and Student Life advisers, the team came together and pulled off a very successful event.

“We all have our strengths, and combining them to serve the OU community was a great feeling,” Allmond said.

After many attempts to secure an artist for this concert, the team was able to book popular acoustic artist Iron & Wine with Cory Chisel as the opener. Iron & Wine is singer-songwriter Sam Beam who resides right outside the Austin, Texas area.

When asked about the challenges this event presented, Allmond was very positive, stating that everything went very smoothly and everyone involved was very helpful.

As Saturday night came around, approximately 4,500 students gathered on the east lawn of the Union to listen to both of the talented artists. The success of the event left great memories for everyone involved.

“Preparing for the show and the actual concert was a blast,” Allmond said. “A memory I will cherish forever.”

 


(This is Ben. He likes spring bow ties, music, and he’s also kind of a big deal around OU.)
Let the Good Times Roll
When Ben Rector’s concert at Meacham Auditorium sold out in advance, he added a second show. When his second show sold out forty minutes later, he called his contact at the university because he thought it was a fluke
It wasn’t a fluke.
For a twenty-something that grew up in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Rector has been experiencing a notable degree of success. Based in Nashville, Tennessee, he has now released four albums, the most recent being “Something Like This” in 2011. This young, bowtie-wearing artist is no longer wet behind the ears. He’s starting to earn his spurs.
Rector’s concert was part of his spring tour for 2013, dubbed “The Rectour”, a 32-city tour spanning U.S. and Canada. It wasn’t too long ago that he was here in Norman touring with Andrew Belle, but this time the show is all about rising star Rector.
In an interview with The Oklahoma Daily, Rector said he wanted to come back to Norman because of the special ties he has to this part of the country, specifically to the home of the Sooners.
“There’s actually a studio in Norman where I made some of my records,” Rector said. “It was definitely somewhere I wanted to get back to.”
Rector also said in The Daily interview that it is incredibly enjoyable playing for college-age audiences—specifically because of the energy they possess.
“College is a fun time of life,” Rector said. “There’s a cool energy. They’re excited to be there. I’m excited to be there.”
He wasn’t the only that had a good time at his concert. Advertising sophomore Caitlyn Kayser said he surpassed her already high expectations.
“He sounds just like his records,” Kayser said. “He also has a very good sense of humor and interacts with the audience while he plays, so it makes it that much more fun to be there!”
Ben has definitely made his mark on the students of OU; one can only hope he keeps coming back to Norman to “let the good times roll”.
(To understand the above reference, check out one of his classic hits: Let the Good Times Roll. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yE2YeW99_tE .)
Happy touring, Ben Rector. Thanks for stopping by Norman!
Did You Know?
-While he did take piano lessons as a child, Ben didn’t start seriously pursuing music until high school.
-His first band in high school was called “Euromart”; the band dissolved after graduation.
-Ben didn’t study vocal performance at the University of Arkansas—he was a marketing major.
-However, in his freshman year of college he won the grand prize in the John Lennon Songwriting Contest in 2006 with an EP featuring the song “Conversations”.

This event was brought to you by Union Programming Board.

(This is Ben. He likes spring bow ties, music, and he’s also kind of a big deal around OU.)

Let the Good Times Roll

When Ben Rector’s concert at Meacham Auditorium sold out in advance, he added a second show. When his second show sold out forty minutes later, he called his contact at the university because he thought it was a fluke

It wasn’t a fluke.

For a twenty-something that grew up in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Rector has been experiencing a notable degree of success. Based in Nashville, Tennessee, he has now released four albums, the most recent being “Something Like This” in 2011. This young, bowtie-wearing artist is no longer wet behind the ears. He’s starting to earn his spurs.

Rector’s concert was part of his spring tour for 2013, dubbed “The Rectour”, a 32-city tour spanning U.S. and Canada. It wasn’t too long ago that he was here in Norman touring with Andrew Belle, but this time the show is all about rising star Rector.

In an interview with The Oklahoma Daily, Rector said he wanted to come back to Norman because of the special ties he has to this part of the country, specifically to the home of the Sooners.

“There’s actually a studio in Norman where I made some of my records,” Rector said. “It was definitely somewhere I wanted to get back to.”

Rector also said in The Daily interview that it is incredibly enjoyable playing for college-age audiences—specifically because of the energy they possess.

“College is a fun time of life,” Rector said. “There’s a cool energy. They’re excited to be there. I’m excited to be there.”

He wasn’t the only that had a good time at his concert. Advertising sophomore Caitlyn Kayser said he surpassed her already high expectations.

“He sounds just like his records,” Kayser said. “He also has a very good sense of humor and interacts with the audience while he plays, so it makes it that much more fun to be there!”

Ben has definitely made his mark on the students of OU; one can only hope he keeps coming back to Norman to “let the good times roll”.

(To understand the above reference, check out one of his classic hits: Let the Good Times Roll. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yE2YeW99_tE .)

Happy touring, Ben Rector. Thanks for stopping by Norman!

Did You Know?

-While he did take piano lessons as a child, Ben didn’t start seriously pursuing music until high school.

-His first band in high school was called “Euromart”; the band dissolved after graduation.

-Ben didn’t study vocal performance at the University of Arkansas—he was a marketing major.

-However, in his freshman year of college he won the grand prize in the John Lennon Songwriting Contest in 2006 with an EP featuring the song “Conversations”.

This event was brought to you by Union Programming Board.

Soonerthon Catapults to New Heights

The music is blaring, and the energy in the room is palpable. Over a thousand OU students are dancing in the Huff. Sometimes the dance is coordinated, as seniors Amy McGiffin and Elvie Ellis attempt to teach a full-blown dance routine. Most of the time, however, students are just dancing to dance.

No, this isn’t Camp Crimson. It’s something even bigger. This is Soonerthon.

Soonerthon is hosted by the Campus Activities Council to raise money and awareness for the Children’s Hospital Foundation through Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals. Soonerthon has an impact in the community around campus; it helps to fund research in Oklahoma City that directly benefits the Children’s Hospital Foundation and families in Oklahoma.

How did Sooners raise awareness? They danced. They danced for 12 hours last Saturday, which is the normal length of a nurse’s shift. This symbolizes the commitment nurses in Oklahoma make daily to help children—which serves as good motivation around the 8th hour when most students are gasping for a second wind.

This event has been in the works for months, as Soonerthon Chair John Fraser and his executive committee have worked tirelessly to meet the high standard set by last year’s “Dance Marathon”, which raised $105,379 and vaulted the event to one of the top 20 programs of its kind at any university in the nation. Did Fraser and his team succeed?

Dance Marathon 2012: $105,379

Soonerthon 2013: *$196,034.62*

You do the math.

 

But What Does it Mean?

$196,034.62 is a really, really big number—by gargantuan porportions when compared to the average college student’s bank account. What that number means to children, however, is even bigger.

It means children don’t need to be driven down to Dallas to receive proper treatment. It means children like Brock (picture above on the right) can finish his chemotherapy in Oklahoma. It means children like Spencer (picture above on the left) have a chance at a next-to-normal life.

The money raised helps the families of these children stay in Oklahoma for treatment. No 8-hour round trips. No transferring from hospital to hospital. It takes an enormous burden off of their shoulders, so that parents and siblings can focus on what’s important: being a family.

If you were a part of Soonerthon 2013, you didn’t just partake in one of the greatest parties since Camp Crimson’s Retro Night—you made an impact. You stood up for those who can’t stand for themselves.

You stood for the kids.

For the kids.

#FTK


Sooners recycle phones in a LG-sponsored competition
   My fellow Sooners—let’s be real.
   Most of us are in our twenties now, or getting very close. By this point in life, there are likely three or four phones collecting dust in a drawer somewhere that used to be an extension of you; you know, those phones you used to have before you upgraded to smart phone technology. They are filled with phone numbers from middle school friends, text conversations from 2004, and many other things that now have little use for us.
   So why not recycle them?
   SGA will be collecting phones in the SGA Office (a.k.a., the SafeRider voucher office) in a campaign sponsored by LG to recycle these long-unused relics. The campaign is a collegiate competition between seven other universities; whichever school donates the most phones, or phone accessories, will win $5,000 of funding for student activities.
   Now, I know what you are thinking, blog reader—“What’s in it for me?”
   Don’t worry, LG has got you covered—with *free* stuff (the best kind of stuff). The first 250 individuals who donate a phone will receive a $5 gift card to Starbucks, and also the chance to win a new hat or fleece.
   So to sum: you turn in your old phone, and then go get a tall Vanilla Spice Latte with caramel while having fun on your current phone; did I mention you’re also wearing your new fleece in preparation for the potential 2013 Snowmageddon everyone said was coming?
   If that’s not a win-win, than I don’t know what is.
   Stop by the SGA Office over the next two weeks and donate your old phones! Thanks for reading, and Boomer Sooner!

Sooners recycle phones in a LG-sponsored competition

   My fellow Sooners—let’s be real.

   Most of us are in our twenties now, or getting very close. By this point in life, there are likely three or four phones collecting dust in a drawer somewhere that used to be an extension of you; you know, those phones you used to have before you upgraded to smart phone technology. They are filled with phone numbers from middle school friends, text conversations from 2004, and many other things that now have little use for us.

   So why not recycle them?

   SGA will be collecting phones in the SGA Office (a.k.a., the SafeRider voucher office) in a campaign sponsored by LG to recycle these long-unused relics. The campaign is a collegiate competition between seven other universities; whichever school donates the most phones, or phone accessories, will win $5,000 of funding for student activities.

   Now, I know what you are thinking, blog reader—“What’s in it for me?”

   Don’t worry, LG has got you covered—with *free* stuff (the best kind of stuff). The first 250 individuals who donate a phone will receive a $5 gift card to Starbucks, and also the chance to win a new hat or fleece.

   So to sum: you turn in your old phone, and then go get a tall Vanilla Spice Latte with caramel while having fun on your current phone; did I mention you’re also wearing your new fleece in preparation for the potential 2013 Snowmageddon everyone said was coming?

   If that’s not a win-win, than I don’t know what is.

   Stop by the SGA Office over the next two weeks and donate your old phones! Thanks for reading, and Boomer Sooner!

Not even the freezing cold temperatures and snow could stop students Executive Branch students from taking on the Capitol last week.

 Last Tuesday, a group of student representatives braved the cold and trekked to the Oklahoma City Capitol to lobby for more funding for Higher Education in the state’s budget. With the recent rise in tuition at OU, many students found it crucial to make sure their voice was heard.

 Rachel Simpson was one of those students. “With tuition rising all over the U.S., I felt it was really important to take a stand and let our senators and representatives know what cutting state funding means to us,” Simpson said.

 A lot of work and preparation was done before our students took on this great task. Each student who wanted to participate was required to attend a workshop in order to speak intelligently with the representatives.

 Laura Shapiro, SGA director of the exterior, put in a lot of work as well. She and her team called 101 State Representatives and 48 State Senators before the event even took place.

 The senators and representatives seemed to listen to our students and their concerns. “I really like to think that our efforts made a difference. The representatives and senators were very attentive,” Shapiro said. “And I trust that they will make sure that Higher Education remains a priority for the state of Oklahoma.”

Not even the freezing cold temperatures and snow could stop students Executive Branch students from taking on the Capitol last week.

Last Tuesday, a group of student representatives braved the cold and trekked to the Oklahoma City Capitol to lobby for more funding for Higher Education in the state’s budget. With the recent rise in tuition at OU, many students found it crucial to make sure their voice was heard.

Rachel Simpson was one of those students. “With tuition rising all over the U.S., I felt it was really important to take a stand and let our senators and representatives know what cutting state funding means to us,” Simpson said.

A lot of work and preparation was done before our students took on this great task. Each student who wanted to participate was required to attend a workshop in order to speak intelligently with the representatives.

Laura Shapiro, SGA director of the exterior, put in a lot of work as well. She and her team called 101 State Representatives and 48 State Senators before the event even took place.

The senators and representatives seemed to listen to our students and their concerns. “I really like to think that our efforts made a difference. The representatives and senators were very attentive,” Shapiro said. “And I trust that they will make sure that Higher Education remains a priority for the state of Oklahoma.”

“I love going to mandatory meetings with people I don’t know!” –Said no one ever
OU’s student government does a lot of great things for the student body. One of its biggest services is delegating funding from the university to all the student organizations on campus.
The catch?
In the past, student organizations had to send representatives to a painfully slow meeting where they were walked through the necessary paperwork, practices and procedures of being a happy, healthy and fully-funded student organization on OU’s campus.
It has been likened to pulling teeth. It also cost $5,000. SGA, therefore, has adapted to meet the needs of student body.
Moving to the W-W-W 
Instead of a Council of Student Organizations meeting, or COSO, registered student organizations are now only required to complete a brief training program, which can be done from the comfort of their own laptop computer.
After going through the program, each organization is required to take a quiz over the training information. If an organization flunks the first time through, no need to get alarmed. SGA will tell organizations via automatic email what information they got wrong, so they can go back to the training program and find the answers.
If student organizations need more help or want to real-talk it out with their student government, SGA is all ears. The Department of Student Organizations will have office hours in the Conoco Student Center this Wednesday from 2:00-5:00pm, and Thursday from 1:00-4:00pm.
Don’t have time to come into the office hours? 
Totally understandable—email SGA! You can shoot a note to COSO@ou.edu with any questions, comments or concerns about the new program.
Shoot, if anyone wants to complain about it, they could even do that—but I doubt anyone will. This program is the next big thing.
A big shout out to KatieBeth Gardner who designed the program from scratch, and an even bigger shout out to YOU, Sooners, for reading this blog—go out and tell your organizations to complete their training so they can get funding! You have until this Thursday!
Thanks for reading, and make sure that this week you test Sooner!

“I love going to mandatory meetings with people I don’t know!” –Said no one ever

OU’s student government does a lot of great things for the student body. One of its biggest services is delegating funding from the university to all the student organizations on campus.

The catch?

In the past, student organizations had to send representatives to a painfully slow meeting where they were walked through the necessary paperwork, practices and procedures of being a happy, healthy and fully-funded student organization on OU’s campus.

It has been likened to pulling teeth. It also cost $5,000. SGA, therefore, has adapted to meet the needs of student body.

Moving to the W-W-W

Instead of a Council of Student Organizations meeting, or COSO, registered student organizations are now only required to complete a brief training program, which can be done from the comfort of their own laptop computer.

After going through the program, each organization is required to take a quiz over the training information. If an organization flunks the first time through, no need to get alarmed. SGA will tell organizations via automatic email what information they got wrong, so they can go back to the training program and find the answers.

If student organizations need more help or want to real-talk it out with their student government, SGA is all ears. The Department of Student Organizations will have office hours in the Conoco Student Center this Wednesday from 2:00-5:00pm, and Thursday from 1:00-4:00pm.

Don’t have time to come into the office hours?

Totally understandable—email SGA! You can shoot a note to COSO@ou.edu with any questions, comments or concerns about the new program.

Shoot, if anyone wants to complain about it, they could even do that—but I doubt anyone will. This program is the next big thing.

A big shout out to KatieBeth Gardner who designed the program from scratch, and an even bigger shout out to YOU, Sooners, for reading this blog—go out and tell your organizations to complete their training so they can get funding! You have until this Thursday!

Thanks for reading, and make sure that this week you test Sooner!

This Week with SGA

Coffee. Town hall. World peace.

Okay, the last one might be a stretch, but SGA is *definitely* delivering the first two. Let’s tackle these one at a time.

Coffee Beans and Real Talk

Midterm season is right around the corner, and sleep schedules are starting to warp. Do you know what you need? Coffee, obviously—and we’re giving it to you for free. You read right, Sooners—we just pulled out the “free stuff” card.

All you have to do is roll out to Cate Main anytime from 3:30-5 on Tuesday, February 5th, and you can get a free cup of coffee with the leaders of SGA and OU’s Housing Center Student Association. Hot coffee, cool people— no catches! Just real talk with your student leaders.

Got Questions?

Everybody has questions—sometimes people ask them, other times they spew them out as lamenting tweets to @OUProblems. Let US help YOU find answers to your questions. Come to our town hall at the student union’s Will Roger Room at 11:30-12:30 on Wednesday, February 6th, and bring your hard ball questions. We’ll answer them.

World Peace

Again, a stretch, but we have made the world a little easier for you! If you are part of a registered student organization (RSO) that applies for funding from the university, one of our own has made your lives much easier. We’ll have more next week about how KatieBeth Gardner has cleared out the old COSO convention to make way for a slick-and-savvy online alternative to apply for funds.

Free coffee, hard ball questions and money for your student organizations. If you need more good news and warm fuzzies, feel free to listen to Kid President in the video above—he’ll probably be a part of SGA one day.

(Above, Sooners enjoy the “WWW Snowball Fight”. Click the photo above to see the schedule of everything that happened last week.)
Winter Welcome Week makes it Snow at OU
As classes kick off in the spring, students young and old return to campus—and welcoming them back is Emma Hunsaker, Winter Welcome Week Chair, and her executive team for Winter Welcome Week, putting both the “Winter” and the “Welcome” back into the first week of school.
What made this year stand out from the past years is how the executive team broke out of the old mold, according to Hunsaker. “Instead of just repeating events we have “always” done, we started with a theme and plugged ideas, both new and old, into that,” Hunsaker said.
Thanks to a generous donation of ice from Sonic, WWW hosted its inaugural “WWW Snowball Fight” in the Walker-Adams mall—a snowball fight of gargantuan proportions, considering Sonic donated 2,000 pounds of ice. Some of the ice even remained on the ground the morning after.
The motto for the week played on people’s desires to make New Year’s resolutions: “A New Year, a New yOU”, with themes like “Learn a New Skill Day” and “Get Fit Day”.
A challenge in planning WWW is Hunsaker’s team had so little time—like Howdy Week, the executive team only had a semester to plan events, as opposed to the traditional calendar year most CAC events have.
“While planning for just a week’s worth of events in a few months seems easy enough, when your team has schoolwork and other obligations on top of it, it’s pretty difficult to manage,” Hunsaker said.
Despite these challenges, Hunsaker and her team pulled off a successful and fresh take of WWW that has kicked off the semester right. Hunsaker would like to thank her team and everyone involved in the process.
“Chairing CAC WWW has been one of the best experiences I could’ve had, not just at OU, but in life. Thanks to everyone who made this happen! #anewyOU” –Emma Hunsaker, WWW Chair
Welcome back, Sooners. Start the year off right with #anewyOU!
Fun Fact: Winter Welcome Week kicked off in 1974—at the time, however, it went by the name “Aardvark Week”.


(Above, Sooners enjoy the “WWW Snowball Fight”. Click the photo above to see the schedule of everything that happened last week.)

Winter Welcome Week makes it Snow at OU

As classes kick off in the spring, students young and old return to campus—and welcoming them back is Emma Hunsaker, Winter Welcome Week Chair, and her executive team for Winter Welcome Week, putting both the “Winter” and the “Welcome” back into the first week of school.

What made this year stand out from the past years is how the executive team broke out of the old mold, according to Hunsaker. “Instead of just repeating events we have “always” done, we started with a theme and plugged ideas, both new and old, into that,” Hunsaker said.

Thanks to a generous donation of ice from Sonic, WWW hosted its inaugural “WWW Snowball Fight” in the Walker-Adams mall—a snowball fight of gargantuan proportions, considering Sonic donated 2,000 pounds of ice. Some of the ice even remained on the ground the morning after.

The motto for the week played on people’s desires to make New Year’s resolutions: “A New Year, a New yOU”, with themes like “Learn a New Skill Day” and “Get Fit Day”.

A challenge in planning WWW is Hunsaker’s team had so little time—like Howdy Week, the executive team only had a semester to plan events, as opposed to the traditional calendar year most CAC events have.

“While planning for just a week’s worth of events in a few months seems easy enough, when your team has schoolwork and other obligations on top of it, it’s pretty difficult to manage,” Hunsaker said.

Despite these challenges, Hunsaker and her team pulled off a successful and fresh take of WWW that has kicked off the semester right. Hunsaker would like to thank her team and everyone involved in the process.

“Chairing CAC WWW has been one of the best experiences I could’ve had, not just at OU, but in life. Thanks to everyone who made this happen! #anewyOU” –Emma Hunsaker, WWW Chair

Welcome back, Sooners. Start the year off right with #anewyOU!

Fun Fact: Winter Welcome Week kicked off in 1974—at the time, however, it went by the name “Aardvark Week”.